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05/05/2010 12:26:20
mutley2
Posts 15
10-10 I'm gone.And she isn't my wife anymore,Ayway
04/05/2010 16:30:38
gavin and jayne
Posts 14
Hi Dean,

If I am contacted by the Professor in London, regarding Gavin, I will certainly pass on any request for information you have supplied to me.
If and when we hear anything, I will update you.

Best wishes

Jayne
03/05/2010 19:09:12
gavin and jayne
Posts 14
Mutley2. You may gain great pleasure in being blatantly rude to others, stroke damage or not. My opinion is that if your wife makes fun that you have "gained" a masters degree in being offensive to others maybe she should cut off your internet supply and keep you in solitary confinement for a period of time so you can torment yourself and ask yourself "Do I feel good about being an absolute idiot?”. If you get the answer yes you do feel good then that is such a shame. I really do pity your wife I tell you.

I have chosen to ignore your posts on many occasions, all definitely not necessary when you comment on other peoples subjects. Question "Why are you still "hanging around" these forums if you believe they have lost direction in your opinion. May I suggest you take yourself elsewhere and torment people who are not vulnerable?

Only a few days ago, I was asked very kindly by a member of the Stroke Association to attend a young stroke survivors meeting to support and listen to other young people who have had to try to come to terms and cope with this difficult illness. Oh and may I mention that I have also been contacted by the Stroke Magazine to appear in an issue to explain what impact strokes have on not only the suffers but all the people who matter around them. Oh and again, I took part in an abseil off a Liverpool building in support of stroke victims and survivors. How much better am I than anybody else on here!! ANSWER – I am not, I am merely trying to let others know that they may be experiencing similar things to others out there. Although I must mention I don’t remember anybody else behaving like you do on here or any other forum, maybe you are a unique specimen of a stroke survivor. Poor soul.

Dean - I am ever so sorry to post this to your thread but it is not acceptable in my opinion to be offensive or just plain rude on an innocents posting.
I may also let you know, Gavin may have been chosen to attend a hospital in London where a Professor has requested if he can write a case study into his circumstances. If this comes about, I will almost certainly let you know and if so, feel free to pass me any questions you would like me to ask on your behalf. Please bear in mind the appointment will be for a set time, so when you mention earlier about the 1000’s of questions you could ask, maybe look at cutting that number by a fair few!! : -)

Again, Dean - take care. I wish you well and I hope you start to get answers to your questions.

Jayne
03/05/2010 19:01:02
mutley2
Posts 15
Oci1dean, Just the responce that was needed.If I may continue my broken down car analogy.The secret to repairing any thing that has broken down,whether it is mechanical, mental or physiologically based is to find the right fixer. I am perhaps fortunate that my doctor is on the ball and that we are able to choose which consultant we are referred to for almost anything. I managed to get the orthopaedic surgeon I wanted out of a choice of four.The system also told me how long I would have to wait for an op. In my case a new knee. Not that I can use it much now. A bit like marriage.There's loads to choose from but you need to find the right one (I wish!) I'm also lucky that no one, as yet, has had the temerity to abandon me.
edited by mutley2 on 03/05/2010
03/05/2010 16:25:12
oc1dean
Posts 46
We all have neurologists to explain the ins and outs of our brains as it applys.to us(us?) individually Maybe we should be asking them, rather than stumblearound in the darkness of our numbed brains.
Mutley, the reason why I think there are all these questions is because our medical staff has abandoned the survivors. Most of the questions I have asked of my medical staff have been received by blank looks. My origiinal doctor was at least 30 years out-of-date and if our neurologists were giving us decent information some survivor would repeat that back to us on a forum. Sorry but my opinion is that we haven't moved in 2400 years when Hippocrates said, ' It is impossible to cure a severe attack of apoplexy and difficult to cure a mild one’. This leads to the brealfast saying of bacon and eggs - the chicken is involved but the pig is comitted. The medical staff is involved but the survivor is comitted.
Dean
03/05/2010 16:04:16
mutley2
Posts 15
Gavin and jayne.Interesting question mi thinks.Yes I did have a stroke, if not why else would I have stumbled across this forum? Two and a half years ago actually. I still can't walk or control my bladder nor even talk properly. Oh and I'm stuck in a wheelchair 15 hours a day.Thank you for asking anyway. My wife claims I have also gained a masters degree in upsetting people! So here goes. I have been hanging around this forum for at least a year. Recently I have been aware of a tendency towards 'I know more than you' posts.The forum seems (to me at least) to have lost its way a little.There used to be a plethora of advice and support to new members which I know has been both useful and comforting to them and their carers.We all have neurologists to explain the ins and outs of our brains as it applys.to us(us?) individually Maybe we should be asking them, rather than stumblearound in the darkness of our numbed brains. If my car breaks down I wouldn't ask every one in the pub or bar what was wrong would. I? NoI'd go to the main dealers and say "Can you fix this,please?", ergo I would ask the experts. Well, G and J, You did ask didn't you?. Follow me on twitter @bigtuk51
14/04/2010 16:47:51
oc1dean
Posts 46
Jayne, I am on the do-it-yourself rehab program. I have also read numerous research abstracts, articles and books. I am very persistent and pugnacious and I know I will recover. It is just that if we survivors don't start demanding answers to very basic questions, the survivors after us will be even worse off. I have already posted this same question to at least 15 forums with no decent answer. if i knew how to get the ear of neuroscientists I would ask them 1000s of questions. I know neuroplasticity works, I just want a scientist to research and publish exactly what goes on.
Dean
14/04/2010 10:07:39
highonlife
Posts 17
loads of info here:
http://science.education.nih.gov/supplements/nih4/self/guide/info-brain.htm
14/04/2010 10:04:34
highonlife
Posts 17
copied from other place after google search

A neuron is cell that processes and transmits information by electrical and chemical signalling.

Neurons form networks; Neurons are the core components of our nervous system. A neuron will receive a message from ones touching something and numerous other stimuli affecting cells that then send signals to the spinal cord and brain.

Motor neurons receive signals from the brain and spinal cord and cause muscle contractions and affect glands. Interneurons connect neurons to other neurons within the same region of the brain or spinal cord. Ones Neurons are basically multitasking but for a specific purpose.

Research has shown that substantial changes occur in the lowest neocortical processing areas, and that these changes can profoundly alter the pattern of neuronal activation in response to experience. According to the theory of neuroplasticity, thinking, learning, and acting actually change both the brain's physical structure (anatomy) and functional organization (physiology) from top to bottom.

Neuroscientists new findings on Neuroplasticity; referred to as brain plasticity, cortical plasticity or cortical re-mapping is the changing of neurons, which has revealed the neurons are capable of change and or alteration of both structural and functional aspects of ones Neurons.

Hope that this makes scene to you; however the answer to your question is that no Brain Attack patient should ever give up its important to continually stimulate any part of your body post brain attack as its now recorded that people whom had lost the use of limbs have regained that use as long as 17 years later.
13/04/2010 22:05:31
gavin and jayne
Posts 14
Can I ask if mutley2 has actually suffered a stroke?

Dean I don't think anyone can give such information, it's perserverance, patience and sheer determination that will get you through.
I have researched so much since Gavin had his stroke last June and I have learnt enough to last me a life time.
If you are still under a specialist maybe draw up a list and pass it to them for answers.

Jayne
11/04/2010 22:51:24
Guest Well I used to be a computer programmer and there is always a cause and effect. If we never learn that we won't be able to duplicate it in other people.
This is kinda like the cartoon where the scientist is at the blackboard with a really complicated set of equations on it and he writes in an answer, 'Then a miracle occurs', I really don't believe in miracles. I know that there is a specific set of reasons that neuroplasticity occurs and scientists should be working to dicover that rather than just telling us survivors that it works but we don't know how, therfore you are completely on your own.
Dean
10/04/2010 18:18:43
mutley2
Posts 15
Isn't this like asking what will happen if I cut oneof the blue wires in an IBM mainframe computer?The answer is that no one knows.There are,I believe only one and a half million blue wires. Any one nerve in the brain has trillions of synapses (joints that pass impulses to and from the brain,)That, albeit crudely, is why no two strokes sre the same and no two dementias are either.The rewiring of these synapses isn't a case of resoldering them. In the same way that blood capillaries can evolve around a interference in blood flow around damaged tissue to enable healing, the brain has to need the synapses to reconnect.If there's no need t won't. I'm not going to let a clumsy electrician into my multimillion dollar computer to fix one wire am I? At least not if the computer is more or less working O.K. Now if I need the computer to be up to keep my nuclear bunkers air conditioned I might. So If my brain doesn't need to repair itself it won't. So keep going. Convince your maintenance team that they need to repair them there synapses.And no they won't get any overtime.After all do you want it in 6 months or do you want it right? Unlike the electrician you can't put a multimeter across those synapses, so make'em 'avit. for God's sake keep going. There really are trillions of joints around each cell. Now that's magic. Please don't accuse me of being patronising and I'm sorry for going on a bit, but I'm still buzzing from winning over three hundred quid on theNational! Now that's magic!
10/04/2010 13:47:53
Guest Well I have no clue as far as answering your question goes but I am sure there is an answer. I guess I am just saying don't give up, keep and searching and you will find the answer!
09/04/2010 16:28:03
oc1dean
Posts 46
1. Can neurons in the brain handle 2 separate tasks? Can the spot for toe control also handle finger control?
2. If not then how is it decided which parts of brain function are thrown away to neuroplastically recover the dead areas. If no one knows then I guess I will have to believe in magic or a miracle.
Dean
edited by oc1dean on 27/04/2010
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